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The Plantation Garden Archive

Numbers 201 to 250 of the pictures in our archive - in numerical order (That is, the order in which they were scanned)

PGPT201
Date: 1980
Source: photograph by volunteer, probably Allan Sewell

This image of the fountain basin crumbling and overgrown with young saplings can be contrasted with PGPT199 after the efforts of volunteers had restored it.

The rainwater collected in the bottom of the basin explains how generations of frogs had managed to breed there.
PGPT202
Date: 1980
Source: as PGPT201

Another view of the ruinous state of the fountain in 1980

PGPT203
Date:1984
Source: photograph by courtesy of Eastern Daily Press

Much work has been carried out in the 4 years since the Trust was set up (see PGPT 201/2) but the basin has not yet been lined. John Watson (see PGPT192) is the central of the 3 figures and had probably invited the newspaper to give the Trust more publicity, as he frequently did.

In the background, the wall behind the figures has been partly repaired and a topping put in place along part of it. The plan and paths of the Palm House beds have been revealed and planted. The 'medieval' wall is still overgrown with ivy and the balustrading on top of it has not yet been repaired (see PGPT040-2). And of course the resurfacing of the paths is still a long way in the future.
PGPT204
Date: 1980s
Source: photograph by volunteer

An unknown event was taking place to display what improvements have been made: the balustrading of the Italian terrace has been repaired and a lot of the ivy which had covered the whole structure in 1980 (PGPT319) has been removed, revealing the fancy brickwork underneath. Urns have been placed on pedestals and planted. The lawn has been cleared and reseeded and even mowed to give stripes!

However, much work remains to be done - the west bank is tumbledown, like the rockworks on the bottom left, the lower path is rough and the middle path on the left has hardly been cleared. And why the cavities on the lawn?
PGPT205
Date: 2004
Source: photograph by volunteer

This was one of the several successful fetes held in the 1990s and early 2000s to raise funds. Among the popular 'Victorian' attractions were Punch and Judy, barrel organs etc.

Of interest: the restored pillar on the left, part of the collapsed retaining wall which had been rebuilt using materials found in the garden (cf PGPT368): the tree fern beyond it, a gift from a visitor (PGPT100): the recreated summerhouse at the top of the steps (PGPT135). The retaining wall on the west has not yet been restored
PGPT206
Date: 1980s
Source: photograph by courtesy of the Eastern Daily Press

From early days the committee aimed at providing enjoyment and social occasions for volunteers and their families. John Watson (see PGPT192) loved to dress up in his top hat and frock coat, so fancy dress was often the order of the day! Bryony Nierop-Reading, Secretary for many years, can just be seen in the back row behind the bowler hat. Marj Wilson, later to become Head Gardener, can be seen 3rd on the left, front row, and her 3 sons sit at the front.

The EDP had been persuaded to give publicity to the event.
PGPT207
Date: 1980s
Source: as PGPT206

Another photograph of the same event as PGPT206




PGPT208
Date: 1990
Source: photograph by volunteer

This photograph seems to be of the same event as PGPT183, 187

 

PGPT209
Date: 2007
Source: photograph in PGPT archive

In 2007 a female artist brought this life-like painting in to the garden with the suggestion that prints should be made and sold for the benefit of the PGPT and the artist herself. The project was not pursued.
Art teachers have often brought groups of pupils to paint in the garden.
PGPT210
Date: 1980s
Source: photograph in PGPT archive

The Plantation garden was built in a quarry, where chalk extraction had succeeded or accompanied mining for flints. These are examples of the fresh flints which can emerge when the soil is penetrated to any depth.

Flints were used extensively in building the garden, both as uncut pebbles (see PGPT148) and cut or knapped. Some particularly large flints were used in the arched buttresses of the fountain (see PGPT089). Many of the medieval churches in Norwich were built from flints and many of those flints may have been obtained by tunnelling in the area around the Earlham Rd. These tunnels have been explored from the 19c (cf PGPT346) .
PGPT211
Date: 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

The work of restoring the 'Gothic' alcove using materials found in the garden, was undertaken by the building firm W.S. Lusher & Sons.  See also PGPT103,105,130, and Guide book 2009 p34. All the builders who have worked on restoration in the garden have become enthusiastic about the unusual designs and materials they have been arranging, and intersested in the thinking of the original builders.
PGPT214
Date: March 2006
Source: photograph by volunteer

Rock works were a very popular feature of Victorian gardens. Volcanic rock like tufa was considered the most desirable material, but, if this could not be obtained, clinker, a waste product from gasworks was an acceptable substitiute. Henry Trevor probably obtained his clinker from the works on Kett's Hill, now demolished.  The same material was used extensively in the construction of other gardens in that area.

Cordylines can be seen in PGPT002, planted lower on the rockworks.
PGPT215
Date: 2006
Source: photograph by volunteer

Another photograph (seePGPT105) of the 'Gothic' alcove before restoration, with bricks from it lying nearby.
PGPT216
Date: July 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer

This picture shows a group of volunteers who work on Tuesday mornings on all the gardening jobs needed to keep the Plantation looking attractive for visitors. Left - right they are Cynthia (who set up and runs the web site), Marj (Head Gardener), Janet, Dubravka and Jill.The picture was taken on the triangle above the entrance yard, where much hard work is done in propagating plants both for the garden and to sell.

N.b in the background a polytunnel which was later replaced with a permanent greenhouse in 2009. (PGPT245)
PGPT217
Date: 2006
Source: photograph by volunteer Cynthia Gibling

A view of the end of the rockworks which shows clearly the burnt 'volcanic' appearance of the clinker (cf PGPT214), as well as the ruinous state of the 'Gothic' alcove and the end of the restored eastern retaining wall.

PGPT218
Date: 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer, Dubravka Yarwood

Nick Belfield-Smith became Chairman in 2007 after working for many years at a wide variety of tasks in the garden - planting, making compost, building bonfires, putting up gazebos, persuading Floranova to sponsor plants and many more.
PGPT219
Date: July 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer Cynthia Gibling

The summerhouse at the top of the Italian terrace  (cf PGPT135). The reconstruction was made in 2004, but unfortunately the heather roof, which copied the original material, deteriorated and had to be changed to Norfolk reed during 2007 (cf PGPT116).
On the back wall inside was placed a copy of the poster visible in the 1886 photograph (cf PGPT007) and on the side wall an information panel mostly about the Trevor and Page families (cf PGPT415).
PGPT221
Date: 2006?
Source: photograph by volunteer

Tea in the garden on a suumer Sunday became a very popular reason for a visit in the early 2000s. Many visitors told us that they liked to bring their visitors, and elderly relatives were often mentioned! Children too could be left safely to take exercise on steps and paths on the slopes.

A lot of work by volunteers was needed to keep this going, with rotas of servers setting out tables and chairs, preparing urns, washing up, laundering linen, requesting cakes from volunteer bakers and tidying up at the end of the afternoon. Sometimes on rainy afternoons very little money has been taken, sometimes there has been a great contribution to the garden funds.
PGPT222
Date: 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer Cynthia Gibling

Richard Horne carved his name on the shelter he constructed in the Entrance yard of the garden. (See PGPT094, 117)

PGPT224
Date: October 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer Cynthia Gibling

Cobaea Scandens
PGPT225
Date: 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer Cynthia Gibling

Marj Wilson was involved as a volunteer in the Plantation from its early days. Later she did more and more organising of planning and planting and became Head gardener. She designed schemes for the rockworks, the beds on and around the Palm house lawn, in the entrance yard and along the west of the main lawn, as well as organising the regular planning and planting of spring and summer beds. She has made beautiful plans to help visitors identify the plants in the garden.

She has regularly shown favouritism towards those plants which originate from her native South Africa!
PGPT226
Date: c.2006
Source: photograph by volunteer

The lower lawn in full summer bloom. Visible are Geranium 'Rozanne', Crocosmia 'Lucifer' and Heuchera. In the distance the summerhouse can be seen at the top of the Italian terrace.
PGPT227
Date: October 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer

There is a date plaque set into this wall with the date 1871, so we know that Henry Trevor built it 15 years after he completed his house.It was part of his scheme for adding a Palm house to his garden (cf PGPT125). The house is plain and classical in style, the fountain, built in 1857, is decidedly Gothic, and Henry Trevor's taste for the medieval style reappears strongly again in this wall. We know that he walked to his business daily, and on the way would have passed several medieval churches and the city walls, so he had plenty of opportunity to collect ideas for the very idiosyncratic combination of designs that appear along its length - a gargoyle, a cross, a dog's head, a 'man', a coat of arms. Various Gunton bricks - thistle, rose, fleur-de-lys - add to the confusion or interest depending on your taste! For some details see PGPT307f.
PGPT228
Date: 1990s
Source: photograph by volunteer

This view should be compared with PGPT130, where the Gothic alcove has been restored. N.b. also that flower beds have not yet been cut into the lawn and the path beside the lawn is not gravelled.




PGPT229
Date: 1827
Source: drawing in magazine probably by gaol architect Richard Brown

A new City Gaol to replace the old one on Gaol Hill (sited north of the Guildhall) was planned from 1823. It was surrounded by dispute from the start - about its site, design, architect, builder, building materials etc (see Ex Fonte no.11 1990 for a full account). The final decision was to build just outside St Giles gates (see map PGPT296) and the gaol was completed in 1826 for a cost of 30,000, twice the original estimate.
This bird's-eye view shows its situation on the corner between Earlham and Unthank roads, where St John's R.C. Cathedral now stands. It was built to a modern radial plan, with stables, tread mills and a laundry housed in the rectangular projections. Looking beyond the gaol a quarry can be seen - this was the site of the future Plantation garden. A windmill beyond that marks the position of Mill Hill Rd.
Having the gaol as his neighbour when he took over the quarry site in 1855 obviously did not deter Henry Trevor, but he must have been pleased when the gaol was moved in the 1890s and a grand church in the medieval style which he admired so greatly gave him a very different view.
PGPT230
Date: 1919/1920
Source: photograph from Green family album

This picture  gives a wider view of the scene in PGPT063, and illustrates one of the many activities George Green organised in the garden during his mayoralty.
PGPT231
Date: 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer

For the story of the discovery of this pediment at the edge of the space at the top of the Italian terrace see PGPT134. We do not know whether these bricks were produced by Gunton Bros. This is the latest date (1880) to appear in the garden.
  
PGPT232 and PGPT233
Date: February 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

These 2 photographs show a further stage of the work being carried out in PGPT092/3. The collapsed retaining wall in the south west corner of the main lawn (cf PGPT129) was restored by building an inner skin of breeze blocks, then adding a facing built in 'Trevoresque' style using the many fancy bricks which had been gathered from around the garden and stored in the shed since 1980.
As described in PGPT211, all the builders who have worked on restorations have become enthusiastic about examining original walls and adapting ideas from them.
  
PGPT234 and PGPT236
Date: Spring 2009
Source: photograph by Marjorie Wilson

Crocus tommasinianus......and tulips....... in the Spring display

 

PGPT235
Date: March 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

The PGPT was very grateful to receive a legacy from a well-wisher, Michael Andrews, who left the PGPT over 50,000 when he died in 2007. It was decided to spend this on an Alitex, Victorian-style, double-glazed, aluminium-framed green house to replace the polytunnel which had done service since 2003. The green house has helped the gardeners considerably in their work of propagating and tending plants both for the garden and for sale.
This picture shows it in the course of construction. PGPT245 shows the finished structure.
PGPT237
Date: 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer Dubravka Yarwood

The trachycarpus fortunei was a gift to the garden by a visitor who thought that there should be a palm on the Palm house site! It is probably planted where a fountain once stood. Here it is surrounded by spring bedding.
PGPT238
Date: 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer Dubravka Yarwood

John Scotting has been a long term member of the Tuesday group of volunteers, His speciality has been pruning, and the very many old shrubs in the garden give him plenty of scope.
  
PGPT239 and PGPT240
Date: April 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer Dubravka Yarwood

The spring bedding this year was, left, Bellis/Myosotis
right, Wallflowers/Tulips
PGPT241
Date: 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer Dubravka Yarwood

This oblique view of the Italian terrace and rustic summerhouse shows that it is quite a steep climb from the lawn up the slope, which was probably a chalk cliff at the south end of the quarry when Henry Trevor began work on his garden.
Planting on these slopes is definitely hazardous, so the aim is to plant perennials which do not need much maintenance.

 

PGPT242
Date: 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer

 A view looking North of a jazz concert, one of the popular musical events which finds a ideal venue in the garden (if the weather is kind!)
PGPT243
Date: August 2008
Source: photograph by Marjorie Wilson

A view looking north in which can be seen the summer bedding, the fountain, the boiler house glazed shed and the rustic bridge.
PGPT244
Date: August 2008
Source: photograph by Marjorie Wilson

The planting in the foreground includes astilbes and tree ferns.  In the background can be seen the wall restored in the south east corner of the lawn and the restored Gothis alcove beyond.

 

PGPT245
Date: 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer Cynthia Gibling

For the story of this greenhouse see PGPT235, where it is seen partly built.

While this greenhouse is not an exact replica of the original (and we have no evidence of its appearance), it is typical of the style of the time

 

PGPT246
Date: 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer Cynthia Gibling

This retaining wall in the south west corner was restored by W.S.Lusher & Sons Ltd. For other views see PGPT232/3.
It has been possible for some building work in the garden to be carried out by those skilled volunteers, who have had experience in the trade (cf PGPT247), but some work, like this wall, has needed machinery and more continual labour  and firms have been employed. N.b. it is still money raised by volunteers which pays the builders' bills!
PGPT247
Date: 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

The 1883 map shows that Henry Trevor's design included many flights of steps to exploit the different levels of the garden, so as to make interesting walks and give varied views from above on to the colourful flower beds below. Many of these flights have been lost, some have been restored, and some await repair. This flight, east of the rustic summerhouse at the top of the Italian terrace, were rebuilt by Doug Stewart and Graham Pierce. PGPT278 shows an earlier stage of the work.
PGPT248
Date: 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

Foxes have made their earths and bred in the Plantation for several years. Cubs make an endearing sight for visitors, but they ruin flower beds, dig up lawns and weaken banks, so they do present a problem in the Plantation and indeed in many parts of Norwich.
PGPT249
Date and source as PGPT248






PGPT250
Date: Spring 2009
Source: photograph by volunteer

Unlike the foxes, frogs receive an unqualified welcome in the garden! They arrive from all over the garden every spring, make a great deal of amorous noise and clamber into the fountain basin, whatever obstacles need overcoming, to create another generation for the garden.

 

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The Plantation Garden Preservation Trust, 4 Earlham Road, Norwich, Norfolk.