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The Plantation Garden Archive

Numbers 101 to 150 of the pictures in our archive - in numerical order (That is, the order in which they were scanned)


PGPT101
Date: October 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

Kitty Plaskitt was one of the original volunteers who worked in the garden from 1980. She was responsible for many years for providing plants for the plant stall - a major contribution to the funds of the garden.
PGPT103
Date: 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

This is the 'Gothic alcove' restored (cf PGPT091)
PGPT104
Date: 2001-2004
Source: photograph by volunteer

This photograph of the fountain shows how its plan resembles an irregular triangle. The dog/lion faces repeated around the frieze are probably from Gunton Bros stock of fancy bricks, and perhaps the brick with the man's face is from the same source. Visitors like to think this is a portrait of Henry Trevor himself! They also often think that the material used is carved stone, but it is actually moulded bricks made by Gunton Bros.
PGPT105
Date: 2006
Source: photograph by volunteer

The 'Gothic' alcove before restoration (cf PGPT091). These ruins helped to indicate the original design.
PGPT106
Date: probably 1850-60
Source: Kathleen Barnard, descendant of Henry Trevor.

This photograph is probably of Henry Trevor. The inscription on the back of the original, in the Trevor family's collection of photographs, reads 'Great-grandfather Trevor'. Unfortunately, because of a marriage of cousins, there were 2 great-grandfather Trevors - Henry and his brother Frederick. As Henry was the prosperous one it seems more likely that he afforded a photograph.

Henry was born in Wisbech but came to work in Norwich as a young man (see PGPT079 for the opening of his business in Norwich). He married his employer's daughter, Mrs Mary Page, and became stepfather to her 3 young sons, the eldest of whom, John Page (PGPT168), became a partner in his business.Henry and Mary had several children of their own, but only one, Eliza (PGPT162), survived to adulthood.

In 1855 Henry bought the lease of an old quarry just outside the city walls and built a fine house (PGPT067), then started creating a picturesque garden in the quarry.

He was a very active member of the Baptist church, worshipping and indeed maintaining a chapel in Pottergate (provision of candles, coal and maintenance appear in his account book). He transferred to St Mary's Baptist church when elderly, and took part in building plans there.
PGPT107
Date: early 21c
Source: photograph by volunteer

These 2 volunteers were responsible for many construction projects around the garden. Douglas Stewart, who is wearing a green PG volunteer shirt, made steps, maintained the fountain and looked after the fish as well as organising the appeal to raise money for the reconstruction of the rustic summerhouse. John Gibling has carried out many skilful repairs of damaged woodwork, e.g. of the rustic bridge, hand rails beside steps etc.
PGPT108
Date: 1990s
Source: publicity leaflet

In the late 1990s it was decided that a leaflet would be useful to distribute to hotels, the station, tourist offices around the county etc. It proved very popular.

This map was based, by permission, on Geographers' A-Z and O.S.
PGPT109
Date: April 2006
Source: photograph by volunteer
One of the photographs of the ruins of the 'Gothic' alcove taken shortly before restoration (see PGPT105)

The path behind runs from the southern end of the main lawn to the eastern end of the Rustic bridge. A pioneer volunteer remembers his pleasure at 'discovering'  this path in the early days of restoration. it had been 'lost' amid the overgrown shrubs.
PGPT110
Date: July 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

This view to the Italian terrace shows both the restored wall on the east (left hand) side of the lawn and the collapse of the wall on the west (right hand) side of the lawn. PGPT092 shows reconstruction of the latter under way.
PGPT111
Date: July 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

Set in the Italian terrace wall are 3 terracotta plaques with shields of arms, 2 small and identical, with a larger one below. Research in the early 1980s (see Ex Fonte no.4 p9) into the heraldry showed that the upper 2 plaques have arms which can be identified as belonging to particular families - Amherst, Daniel, Tyssen and Mitford. This plaque, therefore, may have been commissioned by William Amhurst Tyssen-Amhurst (or Amherst), who married Margaret Mitford in 1856, and became M.P for Norfolk in the 1880s.

He lived at Foulden Hall, Didlington, which he enlarged in 1854 and 1856. It is possible that Gunton Bros made this plaque for those building works as they made other heraldic plaques for the Bedingfeld family at nearby Oxburgh Hall in the 1840s. Plaques from the latter are also found in the garden (see PGPT289). Nothing is known of the lower design.
PGPT112
Date: July 2007
Source:photograph by volunteer

View on to the steps and slopes of the Italian Terrace taken from the east.

The terrace does not have a date built in like the 'medieval' wall at the other end of the garden, but it seems likely that Henry Trevor built it at an early stage, around 1860: he would not have wanted to leave the bare wall of chalk at the end of his quarry garden exposed, he would have wanted to have access to the higher ground at the south end to gain a 'belvedere'.Also, there are 2 bricks with the moulded letter 'F' built in to separate parts of the walls here, which remind us that his brother, Frederick Francis, died in 1860 and may be commemorated here - there are no other individual letter bricks in the garden.
PGPT113
Date:July 2007 (?)
Source: photograph by volunteer

These 'bunch of grapes' bricks are built in to the walls shown in PGPT112. They were made, like so many of the 'fancy' bricks in the garden, in the the workshops of Gunton Bros of Costessey. This design can also be seen on houses in the Street at Costessey.

The Gunton family brickmaking business grew rapidly from its beginnings early in the 19c, when the work of making bricks for the medieval Costessey Hall gave them the opportunity to make the medieval styles which became so popular in the mid 19c.
PGPT114
Date : July 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

In 1980 the ruins of a thatched summerhouse (PGPT255)were found on the lawn beside the Beeches. No such structure was shown in that position on the 1883 O.S. map. However, the map did show a structure with measurements corresponding to the remaining sections at the top of the terrace at the south end, and it was clear that a summerhouse in this position would look most fitting.
This prompted the Trust in 2002 to raise funds to recreate a summerhouse there, using the evidence of a photograph of 1886 (PGPT415) and the remaining fragments. A small surviving piece of the roof showed that it had been made of heather, and so the reconstruction was roofed with heather. Unfortunately this did not prove successful: it is possible to see in this picture the deterioration of the heather thatched roof which led to reroofing in Norfolk reed in 2008 (cf PGPT090)
PGPT115
Date: July 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

There was an unfortunate incident during a hot spell in 2007 when a young bird was so eager to drink that it fell in to the fountain and was drowned. John Gibling, a volunteer, made this leaf shaped lead bird bath for the top of the rockworks in the hope of preventing other such accidents.

Bird nesting boxes have been provided in the garden too, and many birds live there. The dawn chorus has been much enjoyed by the brave souls who listen to it at 4 a.m on a summer morning!
PGPT116
Date: April 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer

A view of the restored rustic summerhouse at the top of the Italian terrace, after the roof had been renovated with Norfolk reed (see PGPT114).

Visible on the inside wall is an information board about the summerhouse.
PGPT117
Date : September 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

The shelter in the yard under construction. The completed shelter can be seen in PGPT120.
PGPT118
Date: September 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

A further stage of construction.
PGPT119
Date: October 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

The purpose of the net placed over the fountain each autumn is twofold: to stop leaves falling into the water to the detriment of the fish, and to prevent a repetition of the occasion when a heron ate all the fish! In 2007 an old torn net was replaced with this smart new one, made by Cynthia and John Gibling, who had experience of boatbuilding. See also PGPT287.

 

PGPT120
Date: October 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

The oak shelter finished!(cf PGPT117/8). Also visible is the Victorian post box used as an 'honesty box' for entrance fees when no volunteers are present (cf PGPT084)
PGPT121
Date: October 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

View from above of the newly finished shelter (cf PGPT120)

The rustic bridge, restored in 1998, is also visible to the right (cf PGPT402).

 

PGPT122
Date: September 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

Head Gardener Marjorie Wilson is examining the notice tied on to the trunk of a clematis  which climbs into a yew tree near the west end of the rustic bridge. This trunk has so large a circumference that the PGPT claims it as champion of the UK, and considers it may even have been planted during Henry Trevor's life.

 

PGPT123
Date: September 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

This is the blossom of the clematis shown in PGPT122
PGPT124
Date: September 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

Volunteers here make use of the newly finished shelter to take their mid-morning break. The 'Tuesday Group' was so named because they meet regularly on Tuesday mornings to do gardening, repairs and construction work. Their efforts over the years have made a great contribution to the garden.

 

PGPT125
Date: May 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

This 'gargoyle' head (perhaps another product of Gunton Bros (see PGPT104) was built into the 'medieval' wall at its northen end. This wall (cf PGPT305) was built as a retaining wall in 1871 (date on plaque in wall) when Henry Trevor erected his Palm house. Previously the ground had sloped from the house down to the fountain, but in 1871 he levelled a sufficient area to build his large Palm house (see PGPT001, 002)
PGPT126
Date: August 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

On the O.S. map of 1883, flights of steps were marked clearly on the slopes in many parts of the garden, though by 1980 many had almost disappeared. This photograph shows work on the reconstruction of steps leading from the wide space at the top of the Italian terrace to the path running round the upper boundary of the garden.the completed work can be seen in PGPT247.
PGPT127
Date: August 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

Several beds in the garden, including 3 on the lower lawn, are planted twice each year with bedding plants in a modified version of Henry Trevor's original 'carpet bedding'. In 2007 this central 'wheel bed' had a central plant of ficus, with spokes formed by ophiopogon and triangles of pink and white forget-me-nots. A box edging surrounded the whole.

Henry Trevor's aim was that there should be attractive views down on to the bedding from the walks he created around the sloping sides ( see PGPT098 for plan with walks marked).
PGPT128
Date: 2007
Source: Richard Horne

This is the design for the shelter drawn by Richard Horne, the craftsman who built it (PGPT094). The completed shelter is shown in PGPT120.
PGPT129
Date: October 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

This view was taken to illustrate the damage done by foxes digging up the lawn in search of worms and other prey. Urban foxes are a regular nuisance in the centre of Norwich and can often be seen crossing gardens even in broad daylight. For some years they have have made lairs (see PGPT130) and produced cubs in the Plantation, so that the Trust has been forced to place unsightly fences around the flower beds to preserve the plants. It would be very difficult to get rid of them without upsetting many people who understandably consider that foxes, especially the cubs, are a charming sight (PGPT248/9).

In the background is another view of the collapsed south west bank before the retaining wall was restored (see PGPT246).
PGPT130
Date: October 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

This photograph shows the path along the lower level of the eastern slope. Like PGPT129, it shows damage done by foxes - the sandy soil on the path has been spread by foxes digging their lair in the slope above.

Of interest also is this view of the side and top of the restored 'Gothic alcove' (see PGPT091).
PGPT131
Date: October 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

This view of the damage done by foxes was taken from the opposite angle to PGPT129

 

PGPT132
Date: October 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer

The summer of 2008 was a hot one, as this picture of fruit setting on the banana plant (PGPT268) which grew on the upper lawn testifies!
PGPT133
Date: October 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer

In 1842 Henry Trevor opened a furnishing business in Norwich (cf PGPT079). The business flourished, first under Trevor's own name, later as Trevor and Page when he took his eldest stepson into partnership (cf PGPT106):
eventually the name was shortened to Trevor Page.The business was finally closed in 1983, by which time it had been under the control of Mr A.G. Hodges for some years. His son Lt. Col. Hodges preserved the sign which had hung outside the shop, relocated to Queen St, together with its iron support. The sign had been repainted by the firm in the 20c: the support may date back to the 19c.

Lt.Col. Hodges donated the sign to the PGPT, and it was decided to restore and erect it in the entrance yard, together with an information board about the history of Trevor Page.
PGPT134
Date: October 2008
Source: photograph by volunteer

In 1994 an accidental slip of the foot led to the discovery of this brick pediment in the bank to the East of the summerhouse at the top of the Italian terrace (see Ex Fonte 14 for a drawing and full report).

It has the date 1880 carved into the brick, almost hidden among the carvings of fruit and foliage, and the letter 'J' (?) may be carved in the centre. This is one of the few dated items that appear in the garden, and shows that Henry Trevor was continually changing and adding to his garden.
PGPT135
Date: June 2004
Source: photograph by volunteer

The photograph shows the recreated rustic summerhouse (cf PGPT114) at the top of the Italian terrace steps. At this date the heather roof is still in reasonable condition. Clearly visible are the 'swans' decorating the front panels, inspired by the panels surviving from Henry Trevor's original summerhouse (PGPT331).
PGPT136
Date: 10th July 2007
Source: photograph by volunteer

The 'Gothic' fountain was built by Henry Trevor in 1857, a year after he finished his house (cf PGPT366). It must have provided immediately a view point of interest in the quarry where he was planning his garden. It is a unique feature: a tribute to the popularity of the Gothic style in the mid 19c - a reminder that the Houses of Parliament were under construction during 1857. The materials used include flints, probably from the site itself, which form the buttresses that give the impression of a grotto. There are also a large number of Gunton Bros white bricks, moulded into classical and Gothic patterns, which have weathered to look like stone. The 'windows' with the cusps in their tops, match drawings in the Gunton catalogue (PGPT300).
Thus this structure combines the attractions of a ruin, a fountain, a grotto, a fish pond and a lily pond.
PGPT137
Date: 1956
Source: photograph donated by Mrs High, trainee midwife

George Green's death in 1929 (PGPT087) marked the end of the use of the Plantation as a private house. In the following decades it was used first as a private clinic, and then as a hostel for midwives in training. Fortunately some of them took photographs in their leisure moments (few and far between according to some of the accounts they have given of their life at the time!) and Mrs High donated several to the PG archive.

The original plaque with the date 1857 is visible on the pedestal here. It disappeared in the 1960s, and was replaced in 1992 by a reproduction in stone (PGPT367).
PGPT138
Date: 1947-50
Source: photograph donated by Mrs Dalziel

Mrs Dalziel was also a trainee midwife and she donated photographs of herself and her contemporaries, after she visited the garden in September 1990 from her home in the Wirral.
PGPT139
Date: 1947-50
Source: as PGPT138

Here the style of numbers on the original date stone can be seen clearly. The obvious presumption is that there was no water in the fountain basin!
PGPT140
Date: 1956
Source: as PGPT137

This time the group of midwives has chosen the wall at the northern end of the lower lawn as a background for their photograph (cf PGPT060) The pedestal on the left clearly lacks an urn which should stand on top. The plaque is one of several of the same design in various parts of the garden: it is tempting to think that once again Henry Trevor bought a bargain lot from Gunton Bros. Certainly the mouldings which frame the plaque and the cross design on the wall are Gunton style (see PGPT043/4)
PGPT141
Date: 1947-50
Source: as PGPT138

Another of the photographs taken by midwives staying at the Plantation. The background chosen here is the Doulton fountain (PGPT284) situated on the lawn beside the house (cf PGPT014)
PGPT142
Date: 1956
Source: as PGPT137

As in PGPT141, these midwives also have chosen the Doulton fountain on the upper lawn as the background of their photograph. Cardigans and different plants in the fountain basin indicate a different time of year.




PGPT143
Date: 1930s
Source: photograph donated in 1997 by Mr T.C.L. Walwyn

In the 1930s the Plantation was home to a maternity clinic/nursing home where private doctors performed operations and delivered babies. During this time the room to the right of the front door was converted into an operating theatre see PGPT151). Here a group of nurses, smartly dressed in their uniforms, pose with newly delivered babies and a mother(?) on the lawn beside the house.

Mr Walwyn sent these photos from his home in Vancouver, Canada. He was born in the Plantation clinic, and identified himself as one of the babies in the wheelbarrow in PGPT145.
PGPT144
Date: 1930s
Source: as PGPT143

Presumably a mother with the baby she has borne in the Plantation clinic.

In the background are visible an urn shaped like a shell (still there) and the balustrade (now restored, see PGPT040/1/2).

Photographs dating to 1947 and 1956 (in the archive but not included here) show the same urn but with a fence replacing the fallen balustrade.
PGPT145
Date: 1930s
Source: as PGPT143

As in PGPT143, a smartly uniformed nurse is showing off her charges - in a rather risky conveyance! The Roman Catholic cathedral can be seen in the background of this photograph taken on the lawn beside the house. Mr Walwyn identified himself as one of the babies in the wheelbarrow.
PGPT146
Date: 1930s
Source: Photograph donated by a nurse

The background chosen here was the front of the Plantation house. The nurse looks very similar to the one in PGPT145. Was this a record of a patient being collected after a successful stay in the maternity home?
PGPT147
Date: 1990s (?)
Source: postcard sold by PGPT

One of the ways the Trust tried to raise money was by printing and selling postcards. Their first publications in the1980s were of old sepia photographs: this example comes from the second batch, when improvements could be illustrated. Thus the fountain has been cleared, repaired and the basin filled with water, flower beds have been cut into the lawn, and the bed along the edge of the Palm house lawn has been planted.
PGPT148
Date: 1990-2000
Source: as PGPT147

This postcard shows one general view of the garden and 3 details - the angel on the 'window' (see PGPT096), details of the fountain and the dog's head on the 'medieval' wall. The background here has been constructed with pebble flints - elsewhere variety is provided by using knapped flints.

PGPT149

Date: 1940

Source: photograph from Harvey family

This photograph, showing a young couple resting after a game of tennis, was donated with quite a story.

Edward Harvey's sister was on the midwifery staff at Plantation house and so when he came home on leave from the army in 1940 he was allowed to play on the court on the lower lawn with his wife, Connie. Sadly, he was killed in Italy in1944.

Mrs Harvey remembered having ante-natal care herself at the Plantation, though babies were born at Earlham House. She remembered that her sister-in-law lived with other nursing staff in 'the bungalow', which was built on the area now known as the 'triangle', to the east of the entrance yard.

PGPT150
Date: 1947-50
Source: as in PGPT138

The midwives are seen here in front of Plantation house, in their uniforms, setting off for work on their bicycles, their accustomed method of transport.

 

 

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